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Biology Syllabus

August 11, 2011

BIOLOGY
SYLLABUS
MR. DROZD

General requirements.  Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.  Prerequisites: none.  This course is recommended for students in Grades 9, 10, or 11.
I would like to welcome you to this year’s science course!  I believe that science is an interesting and exciting topic.  The more we know about the world around us, the more fascinating it becomes . . .
This year you will be using a textbook called Holt Biology. The textbook has a rich bank of science content and plenty of examples to help make that content relevant to daily life. In addition, the book clearly outlines lesson objectives and vocabulary. By mastering these concepts and terms, you will gain a solid base in science and will be well prepared for high school science courses. You will also have many opportunities to reinforce, extend, and apply what you learn with fun and meaningful investigations and activities. And you can rest assured that this program meets our state and national standards for science!
My goal is to create a classroom environment that will help you:
• Conduct field and laboratory investigations
• Learn about the natural word
• Learn about systems, cycles, structures, and processes that interact
• Build a solid science vocabulary
• Gain a strong understanding of key scientific principles and topics
• Learn how to use mathematics to tackle scientific problems
• Find out about the latest technologies and use many of them to learn more about science and our world
• See how science is related to all other disciplines
• Effectively prepare for standardized assessments
• See science as worthwhile and meaningful
• Develop thinking skills and the ability to challenge assumptions, think creatively, and solve real-life problems
• Have Fun!

I will be monitoring your progress with the following grading policy.
Science Grading Policy
Category Percentage of final grade
Homework, Labs, and Quizzes 50%
Labs, Projects, and Tests 50%

TOTAL 100%
Each of the above categories plays an important part in your learning.

• Homework Students will be assigned homework several times per week. Homework may be a reading assignment, a worksheet, review questions, take-home activities, or unfinished class work.
• Labs Students will be doing a number of exciting laboratory activities this year. To ensure that students have fun and succeed in the laboratory, it is important that they have a good understanding of safe lab practices. Please help me maintain a safe environment by reviewing the safety guidelines on page 1024-1027 in your textbook.  When you are sure you understand and agree to the safety guidelines, sign the safety contract, also get your parent or parents to look over the safe lab practices with you. With that signed contract, you will be welcome in the science lab.  One or two lab activities will be counted as test grades per grading period; the rest will be daily grades.
• Quizzes and Tests To ensure that students are regularly completing and understanding their course work, I usually administer one quiz per week (daily grade). I assess student progress with a more formal test at least one unit exam per grading period. If you earn a test grade of C or lower, please visit with me about ways to improve your progress.
• Projects I anticipate assigning at least one project per grading period. Special projects are fun and challenging additions to you regular course work.
• ***End of Course- Students will take exam online at the end of the year.
• Late or Makeup Work In certain circumstance, I may accept late work. If you have an excused absence, please visit your class make-up work folder to receive a summary of the class you missed and your assignments.  (Follow the Student Handbook for the appropriate amount of days you have to get your work in to me)  If you know you are going to be absent get your work from me before you leave the day before.
• Please know that it is my priority to ensure that you have adequate assistance and ample opportunity to succeed in this class. If your parents have any questions about the class have them call (361) 596-4691, Moulton High School Campus.  My conference period is 5th period, 12:20-1:10 during the school week.  
I would like to welcome you to this year’s science course!  I believe that science is an interesting and exciting topic.  The more we know about the world around us, the more fascinating it becomes !!!!

The instructor reserves the right to alter the course requirements, schedule, and/or assignments based on new materials, class discussions, and changes in objectives.

Week 1
Objective 1:  (one week) safety, use & conservation of resources, and proper disposal or recycling of materials
1. Hand out:  Syllabus/scope & sequence, Textbooks (home and class copy) and cover (paper book cover only), Lab manuals, Study Guides, TAKs Formula Chart, How to read a MSDS Sheet
Folder Setup:  Syllabus/scope & sequence (write Textbooks, Goggles, Calculator #’s on Top Right); Grade sheet; TAKs Formula Chart; How to read a MSDS Sheet; Dividers-notes, daily work, and labs.
Journal Setup:  Name on outside and inside of Journal; you may decorate as you wish but remember this will be graded.  (Anything vulgar or improper will result in a failing grade and made attention to the Principal and Parents or guardians)
Cover: Safety in Textbook pp. 1024-1027 and safety devices in room, How to read MSDS Sheet Handout, Conservation and Recycling of Materials Handout.
2. Cover: Safety in Textbook pp. 1024-1027 and safety devices in room, How to read MSDS Sheet Handout, Conservation and Recycling of Materials Handout.
3. Cover: Safety in Textbook pp. 1024-1027 and safety devices in room, How to read MSDS Sheet Handout, Conservation and Recycling of Materials Handout.
4. Quiz on Safety in Textbook pp. 1024-1027 and safety devices in room, How to read MSDS Sheet Handout, Conservation and Recycling of Materials Handout.
Objective 2:  (three weeks) Scientific Method and Equipment
5. Introduce Textbook Chapter 1 Sections 1, 2, 3 and Appendix  pp. 1028-1083 covering
2A-Define Science and its limitations
2B-Hypothesis Experiment Theories Laws = Tentative and testable statements that must be capable of being supported or not supported by observational evidence. (Old TAKs questions)
2C-Theories-based on Natural and Physical phenomena = research project on multiple theories.
2D-Distinguish between hypotheses and scientific theories.
2E-Experiment
2F-Collect and organize qualitative and quantitative information, accuracy and precision, tools including:  Calculators; spreadsheet software; data-collecting probes; computers; glassware; microscopes; degree Celsius thermometers; hot plates; journals; cameras; incubator; meter sticks; diagrams; prepared slides; stereoscopes; metric rulers; electronic balances; gel electrophoresis; micropipettes; hand lens; lab notebooks; timing devices; Petri dishes; dissection equipment; models; samples of specimens.
2G-Analyze, Evaluate, make inferences and predict trends from data
2H-Conclusions- lab reports, drawings, graphic organizers, journals, summaries, oral reports, technology based reports.
Week 2
Objective 3 (Throughout year in Labs) Critical Thinking, Scientific Reasoning, and Problem solving
3A- analyzes, evaluate, and Critique scientific explanations examining all sides of scientific evidence
3B- Communicate and apply scientific information:  Current events, News reports, Published Journal Articles, and Marketing Materials.
3C-draw inferences-Promotional materials for products and services (ingredient labels/advertisements)
3D-evaluate the impact of scientific research on society and the environment
3E-evaluate Models according to their limitations in representing biological objects or events.
3F-research and describe the history of biology and contributions of scientists
1. LTF Exp. 1 The Scientific Method
2. LTF Exp. 1 The Scientific Method
3. LTF Exp. 2 Numbers in Science
4. LTF Exp. 2 Numbers in Science
5. LTF Exp. 2 Numbers in Science
Week 3
1. LTF Exp. 3 Literal Equations
2. LTF Exp. 4 Graphing Skills
3. LTF Exp. 5 Microsoft Excel  and LTF Exp. 6 Graphing Calculator
4. LTF Exp. 6 Graphing Calculator
5. LTF Exp. 7 Data Collection Devices
Week 4
1. LTF Exp. 8 Computer Graphing Software
2. LTF Exp. 8 Computer Graphing Software and Lesson 4 Preparing Formal Lab Reports
3. LTF Exp. 9 Essay writing skills
4. LTF Lesson 1 Using Scientific Measurement (Green Beans)
5. LTF Lesson 2 Vitruvian Man (S.M./Hypothesis)
Week 5
Objective 4 (4 Weeks) Cells are the basic structures of all living things with specialized parts that perform specific functions and that viruses are different from cells.
1. Ch 1-1 Themes and Characteristics of Life
          Textbook Ch 3 Cell Structure, Ch 4 Cells and the Environment Reference
Cell Project- Design a 3D model  (Due date Week 7)

          
2. Lesson 8 Microscope Measurement (Textbook reference pp. 1028-29)
3. Lesson 8 Microscope Measurement (Textbook reference pp. 1028-29)
4. Lesson 9 Larger is Not Always Better
4A- Compare and contrast Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cell (Reference Ch 3)
5. Lesson 10 The Fluid Mosaic Model
Week 6
4B- Investigate and explain Cellular Processes (Reference Ch 3-5)
1. Homeostasis Ch 1-1, 2
Energy Conversions C h 2, 5
2. Transport of Molecules Ch 4
3. Lesson 11 Plasmolysis
4. Lesson 12 The Gate Keepers
5. Lesson 12 The Gate Keepers
Week 7
1. Synthesis of New Molecules Ch 2, 5
2. Lesson 3 The Affects of Acid Rain on Seed Germination (1 period/7 periods  for 10 minutes)
4C Compare structure of viruses to cells, describe viral reproduction and describe the role of viruses in causing diseases such as HIV and Influenza.
3. Ch 20-1 Viruses
Research Project on Viruses (ss, ds DNA/ ss, ds RNA Types) Posters for wall, Student Critique
4. Research Project on Viruses (ss, ds DNA/ ss, ds RNA Types) Posters for wall, Student Critique
5. Cell Project Due, Student Critique and Review of Cell Structure and Function
Week 8
1. Review for Objective 4 Exam, Cells are the basic structures of all living things with specialized parts that perform specific functions and that viruses are different from cells.
2. Objective 4 Exam
3. Objective 5 (3 weeks)  How an Organism grows and the Importance of Cell Differentiation (Ch 6 Reference)
5A  Describe the stages of the cell cycle, including deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication and mitosis, and the importance of the Cell Cycle to the growth of organisms.
Ch 6 Cell Cycle I G1 S G2 PMAT
4. Ch 6 Cell Cycle I G1 S G2 PMAT
5. Lesson 13 Chromosome Manipulation
Week 9
1. Lesson 14 Cell Division
2. Lesson 14 Cell Division
3. Ch 9 DNA Replication, Use Simulations and Models
5B Examine Specialized Cells
4. Plants-Roots, Stems, and Leaves of Plants  (Ch 25 Plant Structure and Function)
Lesson 30 Monocots andDicots, Two Plants with Differences (Examining Stem Structure)
5. Lesson 31 “Hole-y” Moley, Examining Stomates
Week 10    
1. Lesson 32 Transpiration (Investigating Water Movement and Evaporation in Monocot and Dicot Plants)
2. Lesson 32 Transpiration (20 Minutes); Review Ch 25 Plant Structure and Function
3. Animals-Blood, Muscle, and Epithelium
Blood Ch 38 pp. 876-879 Human Blood Wright slide
4. Muscle Ch 37 pp. 856-860
5. Epithelium Ch 37 pp. 846-849
Week 11
1. Review for Objective 5 Exam, How an Organism grows and the Importance of Cell Differentiation
2. Objective 5 Exam
3. Objective 6  The student knows the mechanisms of genetics, including the role of Nucleic acids and the principles of Mendelian Genetics.  The student is expected to:
6A Identify components of DNA and describe how information for specifying the traits of an    organism is carried in the DNA.
          Ch 9 Section 1 pp. 190-193 Discovery Project
4. Section 2 pp. 194-197, Section 3 pp. 198-204  
5. Lab DNA Replication
Week 12
1. 6B Recognize that components that make up the genetic code are common to all organisms.
Human Genome Project Lesson 4 Table of Protein Differences.
2. 6C Explain the purpose and process of transcription and translation using Models of DNA and RNA.
Lab DNA and RNA Models  Ch 10-1
3. Lesson 22:  Proteins, the Essence of Life
4. Lesson 22:  Proteins, the Essence of Life
5. 6D Recognize that Gene Expression is a regulated process
Ch 10-2 Lesson 23 The Trp Operon:  Modeling Gene Regulation
Week 13
1. 6E Identify and Illustrate changes in DNA and evaluate the significance of these changes.
Ch 10-2 Mutations pp. 219-220 HGP Lab?
2. Ch 8 pp. 180-181 Project- Human Disorder Project
3. 5C Describe the roles of DNA, RNA, and Environmental factors in cell differiation.
p. 175, 179, Project  ?, Stem Cells
   4.    5D Recognize that disruptions of the Cell Cycle lead to diseases such as Cancer.
Check points of Mitosis pp. 126-27; Research Project, Type? PP. 126-27, 129, 864,440, 926, 1010, 521, 890, 965, 387, 862
   5.Research Project, Type? PP. 126-27, 129, 864,440, 926, 1010, 521, 890, 965, 387, 862
Week 14
1. 6F Predict possible outcomes of various genetic combinations such as monohybrid crosses, dihybrid crosses and non-Mendelian Inheritance.
Ch 8-1 Mendel Book Report Project (1 Page)
2. Lesson 19 Numbers do Indeed Make a Difference (sample size)
3. Mendel and His Peas (monohybrid crosses)
4. Amazing Maize- Investigating Dihybrid Crosses
5. Amazing Maize- Investigating Dihybrid Crosses
Week 15
1. 6G Recognize the significance of meiosis to sexual reproduction
Ch 7 Meiosis pp. 144-149
2. Sexual Reproduction pp. 150-154
3. Hands on Activity ?
4. 6H Describe how techniques such as DNA fingerprinting, genetic modifications, and chromosomal analysis are used to study the Genomes of Organisms.
Ch 11 pp. 228-242
5. Lesson 25 Bacterial Transformation:  Simulating the Production of Recombinant DNA.
Week 16
1. Lesson 25 Bacterial Transformation:  Simulating the Production of Recombinant DNA.
2. Lesson 24 Electrophoresis Experiment
3. Objective 6 Review
4. Objective 6 Exam
5. Objective 7  The student knows Evolutionary Theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life.  The student is expected to:
7A Analyze and evaluate how evidence of common ancestry among groups is provided by the fossil Record, Biogeography, and homologies, including anatomical, molecular, and developmental.
p. 283, 281, 286, 287
Ch 13 section 1 and 2
Week 17
1. p. 283, 281, 286, 287
Ch 13 section 1 and 2
2. Lab ?
3. 7B Analyze and evaluate scientific explanations concerning any data of sudden appearance, stasis, and sequential nature of groups in the fossil record.
Lab ? Fossil Record Project
4. 7C Analyze and evaluate how Natural Selection produces change in populations, not individuals.
Ch 13-3
5. Lesson 26 Quackers:  Simulating Natural Selection.
Week 18 Midterms
1. 7D Analyze and evaluate how the elements of Natural Selection, including inherited variation, the potential of a population to produce more offspring than can survive, and a finite supply of environmental resources, result in differential reproductive success.
2. Ch 15-1 Populations (r and k strategists, s and l curves)
3. Ch 15-1 Populations (world populations)
4. Semester exam Review
5. Semester Exam?
Week 19
1. 7E Analyze and evaluate the relationship of Natural Selection to adaptation and to the development of diversity in and among species.
Lesson 27 Life in the Cold:  Investigating Survival Strategies and Adaptations.
2. Lesson 27 Life in the Cold:  Investigating Survival Strategies and Adaptations.
3. 7F Analyze and evaluate the effects of other evolutionary mechanisms; including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation, and recombination.
Ch 15-2 Hardy-Weinberg Equation p. 329
4. Normal Distribution Curve p. 331
5. Lab? AP Bio?
Week 20
1. 7G Analyze and evaluate scientific explanations concerning the complexity of the cell
??? Research
2. ??? Research
3. Objective 7 Review
4. Objective 7 Exam
5. Objective 8 The students knows that Taxonomy is a branching classification bases on the shared characteristics of organisms and can change as new discoveries are made.  The student is expected to:
8A  Define taxonomy and recognize the importance of a standardized taxonomic system to the Scientific community.
Ch 14-1 Field Guide Use
Week 21
1. Lab 28 Classification Webquest:  Surveying Animalia attributes.
2. Lab 28 Classification Webquest:  Surveying Animalia attributes.
3. Lab 28 Classification Webquest:  Surveying Animalia attributes.
4. 8B Categorize organisms using a hierarchial classification system based on similarities and differences shared among groups
Ch 14-2 Cladograms/Evolutionary Systematics.
5. Dicotomous Key pp. 314
Week 22
1. 8C Compare characteristics of Taxonomic Groups, including:  Archaea, Bacteria, Protists, Funji, Plants, and Animals.
Project Poster Design, Comparing Taxonomic Groups
2. Project Poster Design, Comparing Taxonomic Groups
3. Objective 9 The Student knows the significance of various molecules involved in metabolic processes and energy conversions that occur in living organisms.
9A Compare the structures and functions of different types of Biological molecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids.
Ch 2 Chemistry in Biology
4. Ch 2 Chemistry in Biology
5. Lesson 5 McMush Lab
Week 23
1. Lesson 5 McMush Lab
2. 9B Compare the Reactants and products of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in terms of Energy and Matter.
Ch 5
3. Lesson 16 Picking out the Pigments
4. Lesson 17 Light, Dark, Does It Really Matter?
5. Lesson 17 Light, Dark, Does It Really Matter?
Week 25
1. Lesson 18 Lights out
2. Lesson 18 Lights out
3. Lesson 15 Yeast and Molasses
4. Lesson 15 Yeast and Molasses
5. 9C Identify and Investigate the Role of Enzymes ch 2-4
Week 26
1. Lesson 6 Enzyme Activity
2. Lesson 7 The Hydrogen Perioxide Breakdown
3. 9D Analyze and evaluate the evidence regarding formation of simple organic molecules and their information such as the DNA molecule for self-replicating life.
Ch 12 History of the Discovery of DNA Timeline Project
4. Ch 12 History of the Discovery of DNA Timeline Project
5. Review Objective 9
Week 27
1. Objective 9 Exam
2. Objective 10 The Student knows that biological systems are composed of multiple levels.  Student is expected to:
10A  Describe the interactions that occur among systems that perform the functions of regulation, nutrient absorption, reproduction, and defense from injury or illness in animals.
Research Project ch 37-43 (7 Chapters)  Human Body, Build a Pamphlet
3. Research Project ch 37-43 (7 Chapters)  Human Body, Build a Pamphlet
4. Ch 27 Introduction to Animals
5. Ch 27 Introduction to Animals
Week 28
1. Ch 27 Introduction to Animals
2. Lesson 35:  Yeast Cells and Digestion of Nutrients
3. Lesson 36:  Circulatory System
4. Lesson 36:  Circulatory System
5. Lesson 37:  Urinalysis
Week 30
1. Lesson 37:  Urinalysis
2. Lesson 38:  Dissection of a Chicken leg
3. Lesson 39:  Kermit vs Mickey Mouse
4. Lesson 40:  Specific Immune Response
5. Lesson 40:  Specific Immune Response
Week 31
1. Lesson 40:  Specific Immune Response
2. Lesson 41:  Making Sense of it All
3. Lesson 41:  Making Sense of it All
4. Lesson 42:  Planarian Behaviors
5. 10B Describe the interactions that occur among systems that perform the functions of transport, reproduction, and response in plants
Plant Ch 23-26 Lecture
Week 32
1. Plant Ch 23-26 Lecture
2. Plant Ch 23-26 Lecture
3. Lesson 33:  Those “Foolish” Plant Hormones
4. Lesson 34: Plant Wars:  Investigating Allelopathic Interactions.
5. Lesson 34: Plant Wars:  Investigating Allelopathic Interactions.
Week 33
1. 10C Analyze the levels of organization in Biological Systems and relate the levels to each other and to the whole system.
Ch 1, atoms, molecules/compounds, macromolecules, organelles, cells, tissues, organs, organ systems.
2. How Systems are related and work off each other (A&P end of chapter diagrams.)
3. Objective 11 The student knows that biological systems work to achieve and maintain balance.  The student is expected to:
11A  Describe the role of internal feedback mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis.
TB pp. 8, 31, 40, 561, 849, 889, Lab 42 also!
4. 11B  Investigate and analyze how organisms, populations, and communities respond to external factors;
Ch 17 Biological Communities
5. Ch 17 Biological Communities Project Posters on Biomes
Week 34
1. Presentation of Posters Biomes
2. 11C Summarize the role of microorganisms in both maintaining and disrupting the health of both organisms and ecosystems
Ch 15-18 Ecosystems
3. Ch 15-18 Ecosystems
4. Lesson 43 Wonderful Pond Water:  Measuring the Impact of organisms on the Environment
5. 11D Describe how events and processes that occur during ecological succession can change populations and species diversity.
Ch 15-18
Week 35
1. Objective 12:  The student knows that interdependence and interactions occur within an environmental system.  The Student is expected to:
12 A Interpret relationships, including predation, parasitism, commensalism, mutualism, and competition among organisms.
Ch 17 Repeat pp. 362-370, Lesson 44 Ecotones:  Investigating Ecosystems using CBL’s
2. 12B Compare variations and adaptations of organisms in different ecosystems;
Lesson 44 Ecotones:  Investigating Ecosystems using CBL’s
3. 12C Analyze the flow of matter and energy through tropic levels using various models, including food chains, food webs, and ecological pyramids Ch 16 pp. 345-349 Repeat;
Lesson 44 Ecotones:  Investigating Ecosystems using CBL’s
4. 12D  Recognized the long term survival of species is dependent on changing resource bases that are limited Ch 15-19 Repeated
Lesson 44 Ecotones:  Investigating Ecosystems using CBL’s
5. 12E Describe the flow of matter through the carbon and nitrogen cycles and explain the consequences of disrupting these cycles Ch 17-3 pp. 350-354 Project or Lab?
Objective 11 and 12 Review
Week 36 Midterms
1. 12F Describe how environmental changes can impact ecosystem stability
Ch 18 pp. 386-400 Repeated, Project Current Event Speech.
2. Objective 11 and 12 Exam
3. Review for Midterm
4. Review for Midterm

 

 

 

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